Flora & Fauna

Red footed in Tortola

The Red Footed Tortoise is found in America,Venezuela, Brazil and some Caribbean islands, including Tortola in the British Virgins.

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Legacy of the flamboyant

It is widely cultivated and may be seen adorning parks, and estates throughout the entire Caribbean. It also provides a stately presence along many island roads.

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Video

Blue Backed Manakins

Watch the seductive dance and listen to Tobago's birds courting

Feature Stories

Pleasures of the parks

The Parks of the U.S. and British Virgins Islands are a source of inspiration and exhilaration for all of us who need to get in touch with nature and ourselves. Click for more.

Herbal remedies

Herbal extracts are plentiful in the Caribbean, where the healing and restorative power of plants and nuts has been passed down for generations. Click for more.

Parrots of the Caribbean

There are 353 species of parrots in the West Indies. Parrots are friendly and make good pets, but they can be fearful and feel the emotions of their surroundings Click for more.

Trailing iguanas

If you're wearing bright red swim trunks or have painted toenails, an iguana may move faster than usual. It may be thinking you're the hibiscus flower it loves to eat. Click for more.

Lumbering red footed

You could be fortunate to see the red footed tortoise out and about for the day. It doesn't do much but lumber along, scrounging for food. Click for more.

A land of symbols

Cuba is one of those four letter words to some pundits and politicians, who let criticism of the country overshadow understanding of its vibrant people, food, music and natural beauty. Click for more.

Calabash

Calabash is perhaps the most versatile fruit in the Caribbean. Wild Calabash grows along tropical canopies and you'll find cultivated calabash, in West Indian gardens bearing a more porous and larger fruit. Click for more.

Dragon fruit

Dragon fruit is considered a cactus, though it climbs to sixty feet as a vine. It originates in the Caribbean and South America, and has spread into Asia. Click for more.

Suriname's natural treasures

Suriname national reserves, blue dart frog, Guianan cock-of-the rock, ecotourism, adventure tours, flora and fauna Click for more.

Legacy of the flamboyant

It is widely cultivated and may be seen adorning parks, and estates throughout the entire Caribbean. It also provides a stately presence along many island roads. Visitors might think islanders invented this tree we call flamboyant, though its formal name, Royal Poinciana, honors a French governor and the use of the trees among royalty Click for more.